Resources

How To Detect Fake News With These Tools and Techniques

Through links to studies and reports as well as applications, journalism educators share several concrete tools readers can use to detect fake news. 
A critical thinking model is provided to show how using cognitive skills to think through content, analyze and make a decision as to what constitutes a fake story is the best method of detecting fake news.

Pew Research: News use across social media platforms, 2017 study

As of August 2017, 67 percent of Americans report that they get at least some of their news on social media – with two-in-ten doing so often, according to a new survey from Pew Research Center. 
For the first time in the Center’s surveys, more than half (55 percent) of Americans ages 50 or older report getting news on social media sites. That is 10 percentage points higher than the 45 percent who said so in 2016.

Journalist’s Resource: Social skills are increasingly valuable to employees

Jobs with social skills are paying higher wages as the labor markets respond to automation, a new paper finds.
“Computers are still very poor at simulating human interaction,” writes David Deming of Harvard University. “Human interaction requires a capacity that psychologists call theory of mind — the ability to attribute mental states to others based on their behavior, or more colloquially to ‘put oneself into another’s shoes.’”
Looking at data on employment, wages and types of job tasks over several decades, Deming quantifies the added value of these social skills.

Transcription: There’s an app for that

Technology has made it easier than ever for reporters to connect with their sources, whether they’re across the street or halfway around the world. With so many digital recording options, it takes no more than a few clicks and swipes to record an interview with a source. The biggest problem reporters face when it comes to digital interviews, however, is how to deal with all the recorded content once the interview is over. Turning those audio files into useable text isn’t always easy. Transcription is a time-consuming and often costly part of the job.

Appointing federal judges and U.S. attorneys: An explainer with resources

While the presidential appointment process for a Supreme Court seat draws national attention, few take notice of federal judge appointments. There are hundreds of federal judges and these appointments, too, are for life. Because the judges wield significant power, they are at the core of a president’s legacy. 
Federal courts have jurisdiction over a wide variety of crimes and civil disputes outlined in the Constitution and other federal statutes, including election fraud, weapons trafficking and terrorism.

How to sell the value of digital without overselling your client

Everyone sells digital. Everyone has similar portfolios. In order to differentiate, you’ll need to go beyond CTRs and CPMs to show clients the value of your newspaper’s services and how you can help them grow their businesses.
Topics covered in this Online Media Campus webinar include how to:
• Simplify digital sales for the customer and your sales team
• Build a client-focused digital recommendation
• Measure the results of digital advertising in a way that matters to your client
• Retain and up-sell current campaigns

How to write headlines that pop

Headlines have never been more important for attracting readers online and in print. Best practices, creative planning processes and tips for reporters, editors and designers will be discussed in this Online Media Campus webinar. Students will learn the art and science of writing winning headlines.
The one-hour event is set for 1 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 21. Deadline to register is Monday, Sept. 18. Registration fee is $35. For more information or to register, click here.

How to Verify Photos and Videos

A webinar scheduled Sept. 20 focuses on how to verify photos and videos that may be fake.
Most fake photos and videos can be checked quite quickly, allowing journalists and researchers to stop the spread of so-called “fake news” before it gets onto their Facebook feeds.

What the unemployment rate does – and doesn’t – say about the economy

The unemployment rate gets most of the attention, but the monthly jobs report contains lots of other data that can provide a fuller picture of the economy.
Simply being out of work isn’t enough for a person to be counted as unemployed; he or she also has to be available to work and actively looking for work (or on temporary layoff). In any given month, the unemployment rate can rise or fall based not just on how many people find or lose jobs, but on how many join or leave the active labor force.