Resources

6 tips for catching your writing mistakes (and protecting your credibility)

You, reporter/blogger, have been working on a story all day, and it’s deadline time. You hope your story’s free of typos and grammatical mistakes. But at this point, you’ve read it so many times, you fear you’ve missed something. No one is available to read behind you and it’s nearly time to hit “publish.”
A training session from NPR offers tips and exercises to bring out the “inner copy editor.”

Stop killing your social stories with bad headlines and images

No matter how great your content is, if you don’t package it properly, few will read or share it. 
Writing a great headline and choosing a dynamic main image for every article matters more now than ever — on a crowded Facebook feed that’s already turning out link posts for video, you’re playing a zero-sum game for your audience’s attention. That headline and image are frequently all anybody’s going to look at.

Webinar: Building a strong service directory

A webinar to help newspapers develop a profitable service directory will be offered by Online Media Service on June 7.
“Building a Strong Service Directory to Increase Revenue” is scheduled from 1 to 2 p.m. CDT on Wednesday, June 7. Registration fee is $35. The session will be recorded so that those who don’t have time in their schedule for the live event can access the recording and see it at their convenience.

Property Taxes 101: A primer for journalists

So the city you cover is considering raising property taxes and your editor wants a story today. If you’re like many journalists, you didn’t get a lot of training in college on municipal budgets. Journalist’s Resource offers some great information for writing about property taxes, what readers need to know about an impending increase in their property taxes and calculations for showing the impact on individual property owners.

How to remember who vs. whom

“Who” is a subject. “Whom” is an object. But in our fast-paced world, there often is not enough time to figure out whether something is a subject or an object, especially if you forgot how to do that. 
We often advocate a sort of test, where you flip the sentence around to determine whether you would use “he” or “him” in its place. If you would use “he,” it’s “who”; if “him,” then “whom.” Sexist though it is, it often works.

How to access Pew Research Center survey data

Pew Research Center regularly makes available the full datasets that underlie most of our reports. We typically do not publish the dataset at the same time as the report. That’s because it takes some time for us to complete all reporting for a given study and to clean and prepare the data for public release. 
There are two ways to locate available datasets.

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